NICOLE ZÏZI STUDIO

| Eco-conscious ready-to-wear garments and products.

Coco and Breezy wears Nicole Zizi Studio on NBC News: [KNOW YOUR VALUE] segment

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This morning, I woke up to a nice surprise. Breezy wearing our Coach’s Denim Jacket on NBC NEWS new segment [KNOW YOUR VALUE] segment. Coco and Breezy spoke with NBC about their trajectory from young women hand-building eyewear to owners of a growing company.  Below is an excerpt from the article. So happy to see their business grow and to be apart of that growth!

“Twin sisters Corianna and Brianna Dotson were bullied as kids growing up in Minnesota, where there weren’t many other women of color. It was during those tough times, however, when they discovered their love for sunglasses, which offered a sense of protection. When they put on their glasses, they felt like they became their alter egos — Coco and Breezy — fearless young women who could conquer the world.

In a sense, the co-founders of Coco and Breezy Eyewear did just that. “We made a negative into a positive,” Breezy told Know Your Value, explaining that she and her sister always had an eclectic style, which they channeled into their fashion by embellishing DIY frames and bedazzling them. “We literally quit our jobs, sold our car, moved to New York with less than $1,000 and started our company.”

Founded in 2009, Coco & Breezy Eyewear started with humble beginnings, yet the glasses quickly caught the attention of iconic artists. In the early days, the Dotson sisters — who were only 19 years old at the time — made glasses in their small Bushwick apartment on an air mattress. Those glasses were eventually worn by Lady Gaga. And within three months, their glasses adorned the faces of Kelly Osbourne, Ashanti, Nicki Minaj and Prince. “Collaborating with a legend like Prince had a huge impact on our company,” Coco said. He asked for glasses with three lenses, and they sketched multiple ideas to turn his vision into a reality. “My dream was always to design glasses for an iconic artist,” Breezy said.

When twins Coco and Breezy first moved to New York City, they had less than $1,000 in their pockets”

Full article at knowyourvalue.com



A “Waterhouse” designed by Frank llyod wright, IntEgrating arChitecture into natUral waTer falls

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Frank Lloyd Wright designed Fallingwater in 1935 for his friend Edgar Kaufmann, and completed it three years later. The client asked for a holiday home for his family that faced the 30-foot (nine-metre) waterfall of the Bear Run Nature Reserve in rural Pennsylvania.

But on visiting the site, Wright spotted a rock that jutted out over the streaming water, and decided to build the house there and let the water flow underneath

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https://www.dezeen.com/2017/06/07/fallingwater-frank-lloyd-wright-pennsylvania-house-usa-150th-birthday/

Doconomy launches credit card with a carbon-emission spending limit

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“Swedish fintech company Doconomy has launched a credit card that tracks the carbon dioxide emissions of purchases, and caps the climate impact of users' spending.

The DO Black credit card directly connects our consumption to the impact it has on the planet, in a bid to encourage us to actively reduce our carbon footprint each day.

Users can make their daily purchases with the DO card, tracking the carbon emissions associated with their spending via the DO app.

The app uses a calculation system called the Åland Index to measure the CO2 produced with every transaction, and allows users to put limits on the climate impact of their spending”

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“Those who sign up to DO will receive access to a free savings account that helps them understand their carbon footprint, learn about UN-certified climate compensation projects, and discover investment funds that have a positive impact on people and the planet.

The card itself is made of bio-sourced material and is printed with Air Ink – an ink made from recycled air pollution particles, namely the unburned carbon soot that comes out of car exhaust pipes, chimneys and generators.

Source: Dezeen